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Netizens Clash as New Photos Reveal Cheat Sheets Used by Biden during Thursday Presser

Netizens Clash as New Photos Reveal Cheat Sheets Used by Biden during Thursday Presser
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By Staff, Agencies

Shortly after Joe Biden staged his presidential press conference on Thursday, photos emerged providing a closer look to what appears to be his cheat sheets, immediately fueling discussion on the internet.

While using notes during pressers is hardly unprecedented, netizens particularly caught how names and pictures of reporters were listed on one of Biden's cards, with some correspondents' pictures having numbers next to them.

Another cheat sheet included key notes on US infrastructure.

“The United States now ranks 13th globally in infrastructure quality — down from 5th place in 2002,” one bullet point reads, still not helping Biden to avoid mistaking on that, as he said that the US ranked 85th in the world in infrastructure, before correcting himself.

After getting a sneak peak into Biden's notes, some twitterians lambasted the press conference for being "scripted", while denouncing the president for not being able to answer questions on his own.

Some came up with their own version of a presidential cheat sheet.

Others, however, argued that Biden's cards only illustrated his preparedness for the press conference and his desire to stick to facts. Some pointed out that not everyone can easily remember a bunch of reporters' names.

Be it preparedness or forgetfulness, Biden still offered a handful of gaffes during his first presidential presser, again asserting that he had been in Senate "for 120 years" and dropping a now memeficated "Jim Eagle" line without explaining who Jim

Eagle is and how he or she is connected with voter integrity.

"What I'm worried about is how un-American this initiative is. It’s sick. It’s sick...This makes Jim Crow look like Jim Eagle", Biden said, commenting on initiatives to require voters to show an ID before obtaining a ballot.

Still, when answering questions, he covered issues including the border situation in the US, the coronavirus pandemic response, foreign policy and gun control initiatives.

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