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Obama Faces Scandal: Syrian Armed Groups Admit Responsibility for Saudi-Supplied Chemical Weapons Attack

Obama Faces Scandal: Syrian Armed Groups Admit Responsibility for Saudi-Supplied Chemical Weapons Attack
folder_openSyria access_time6 years ago
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Syrian armed groups in the Damascus suburb of Ghouta admitted to Associated Press correspondent Dale Gavlak that they were responsible for last week's chemical weapons incident which western powers have blamed on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's forces.

Obama Faces Scandal: Syrian Armed Groups Admit Responsibility for Saudi-Supplied Chemical Weapons Attack The armed groups further revealed that the casualties were the result of an accident caused by militants mishandling chemical weapons provided to them by Saudi Arabia.
"From numerous interviews with doctors, Ghouta residents, rebel fighters and their families....many believe that certain rebels received chemical weapons via the Saudi intelligence chief, Prince Bandar bin Sultan, and were responsible for carrying out the deadly gas attack," writes Gavlak.

In this context, Gavlak stated that they were not properly trained on how to handle the chemical weapons or even told what they were. It appears as though the weapons were initially supposed to be given to the al-Qaeda offshoot al-Nusra Front.
"We were very curious about these arms. And unfortunately, some of the fighters handled the weapons improperly and set off the explosions," one militant named ‘J' told Gavlak.
His claims are echoed by another female fighter named ‘K', who told Gavlak, "They didn't tell us what these arms were or how to use them. We didn't know they were chemical weapons. We never imagined they were chemical weapons."
Abu Abdel-Moneim, the father of an opposition militant, also told Gavlak, "My son came to me two weeks ago asking what I thought the weapons were that he had been asked to carry," describing them as having a "tube-like structure" while others were like a "huge gas bottle." The father names the Saudi militant who provided the weapons as Abu Ayesha.

According to Abdel-Moneim, the weapons exploded inside a tunnel, killing 12 rebels.
"More than a dozen rebels interviewed reported that their salaries came from the Saudi government," writes Gavlak.
According to the agency, this story could completely derail the United States' rush to attack Syria which has been founded on the "undeniable" justification that al-Assad was behind the chemical weapons attack. Dale Gavlak's credibility is very impressive. He has been a Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press for two decades and has also worked for National Public Radio [NPR] and written articles for BBC News.
The website on which the story originally appeared - Mint Press (which is currently down as a result of huge traffic it is attracting to the article) is a legitimate media organization based in Minnesota. The Minnesota Post did a profile on them last year.

Saudi Arabia's role in providing rebels, whom they have vehemently backed at every turn, with chemical weapons, is no surprise given the revelations earlier this week that the Saudis threatened Russia with terror attacks at next year's Winter Olympics in Sochi unless they abandoned support for the Syrian President.
"I can give you a guarantee to protect the Winter Olympics next year. The Chechen groups that threaten the security of the games are controlled by us," Prince Bandar told Vladimir Putin, the Telegraph reports.
US intelligence officials also told the Associated Press that the intelligence proving al-Assad's culpability is "no slam dunk."
In a recent article for Business Insider, reporter Geoffrey Ingersoll highlighted Saudi Prince Bandar's role in the two-and-a-half year Syrian civil war. Many observers believe Bandar, with his close ties to Washington, has been at the very heart of the push for war by the US against al-Assad.
Ingersoll referred to an article in the UK's Daily Telegraph about secret Russian-Saudi talks that Bandar offered Russian President Vladimir Putin cheap oil in exchange for dumping al-Assad.

"I can give you a guarantee to protect the Winter Olympics next year. The Chechen groups that threaten the security of the games are controlled by us," Bandar allegedly told the Russians.
"Along with Saudi officials, the US allegedly gave the Saudi intelligence chief the thumbs up to conduct these talks with Russia, which comes as no surprise," Ingersoll wrote.
"Bandar is American-educated, both military and collegiate, served as a highly influential Saudi Ambassador to the U.S., and the CIA totally loves this guy," he added.
According to UK's Independent newspaper, it was Prince Bandar's intelligence agency that first brought allegations of the use of sarin gas by the regime to the attention of Western allies in February.
The Wall Street Journal recently reported that the CIA realized Saudi Arabia was "serious" about toppling al-Assad when the Saudi king named Prince Bandar to lead the effort.
"They believed that Prince Bandar, a veteran of the diplomatic intrigues of Washington and the Arab world, could deliver what the CIA couldn't: planeloads of money and arms, and, as one US diplomat put it, wasta, Arabic for under-the-table clout," it said.

Bandar has been advancing Saudi Arabia's top foreign policy goal, WSJ reported, of defeating al-Assad as well as Iran and Hizbullah.
To that aim, Bandar worked Washington to back a program to arm and train armed groups out of a planned military base in Jordan.
The newspaper reports that he met with the "uneasy Jordanians about such a base":
His meetings in Amman with Jordan's King Abdullah sometimes ran to eight hours in a single sitting. "The king would joke: ‘Oh, Bandar's coming again? Let's clear two days for the meeting,' " said a person familiar with the meetings.
Jordan's financial dependence on Saudi Arabia may have given the Saudis strong leverage. An operations center in Jordan started going online in the summer of 2012, including an airstrip and warehouses for arms. Saudi-procured AK-47s and ammunition arrived, WSJ reported, citing Arab officials.

Although Saudi Arabia has officially maintained that it supported more moderate militants, the newspaper reported that "funds and arms were being funneled to radicals on the side, simply to counter the influence of rival Islamists backed by Qatar."

But rebels interviewed said Prince Bandar is referred to as "al-Habib" or ‘the lover' by al-Qaeda militants fighting in Syria.

Source: News Agencies, Edited by web site team