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Boris Johnson Doesn’t Rule Out Sending British Troops to Yemen

Boris Johnson Doesn’t Rule Out Sending British Troops to Yemen
folder_openEurope... access_timeone month ago
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By Staff, Agencies

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson blatantly said his government would look at sending troops to Yemen if the conditions were right.

He said the situation would have to be very different before British military involvement would be considered.

“There has been no specific request or suggestion for UK engagement, but it is certainly something that we would be prepared to look at if the conditions were right,” Johnson said during an appearance in front of the foreign affairs committee.

The comments followed a question from the Conservative chair of the committee, Tobias Ellwood, who asked if Johnson would commit to sending forces to the war-torn nation.

The British government is already accused of prolonging the war in Yemen by allowing the export of air-to-air refueling equipment that it fears could be used to help the Saudi air force conduct indiscriminate bombing in the country.

The technology was licensed to Riyadh last summer when arms restrictions were lifted, alongside £1.4bn of other sales, and can be used to help war planes fly longer missions at a time when the conflict is intensifying.

Saudi Arabia, backed by the US and its other regional allies, launched a devastating military campaign on Yemen in March 2015, with the goal of bringing government of Yemen's former president Abd Rabbuh Mansour Hadi back to power and crushing the popular Ansarullah movement.

Yemeni armed forces and allied Popular Committees have, however, gone from strength to strength against the Saudi-led invaders, and left Riyadh and its allies bogged down in the country.

The Saudi-led military aggression has so far resulted in nothing, but the killing and wounding of tens of thousands of Yemenis, as well as the displacement of millions of deprived people, destruction of infrastructure, famine, starvation, and the spread of infectious diseases in Yemen.

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