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Anxious “Israel” Expects 2k Rockets A Day in Any War with Hezbollah

Anxious “Israel” Expects 2k Rockets A Day in Any War with Hezbollah
folder_openZionist Entity access_timeone month ago
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By Staff, Agencies

The “Israeli” entity does not want war with Lebanon's Hezbollah, however, in order to avoid going through the 2006 war events again, it said it is prepared to face about 2,000 rockets a day from the resistance group if conflict breaks out, a senior “Israeli” military official told AFP.

In May this year, the “Israeli” Occupation Forces [IOF] waged an 11-day war against Palestinian resistance movements in the besieged Gaza Strip, who fired around 4,400 projectiles towards the apartheid entity.

The entity said its Iron Dome system intercepted around 90 percent of the rockets.

The rate of fire surpassed that seen in the entity’s 2006 war against Hezbollah, when a similar number of rockets were launched from Lebanon – but over the course of around a month – the IOF said.

In May, cities like Tel Aviv and Ashdod experienced the "highest number of fire towards them in the history of ‘Israel’", said Uri Gordin, chief of the IOF’s “Home Front” Command.

"We saw a pace of more than 400 rockets fired towards ‘Israel’ on a daily basis."

He said that in the case of "conflict or a war with Hezbollah, we expect more than five times the number of rockets fired every day from Lebanon to ‘Israel’".

"Basically we are looking between 1,500 and 2,500 rockets fired daily towards ‘Israel’," he told AFP.

Set up in 1992 after the first Gulf War, Gordin's Home Front Command is responsible for readying the entity in case of threat, conflict or disaster. The unit was criticized for its response to the 2006 war with Hezbollah.

That war was a "wake-up call" for the “Home Front” Command, Gordin said, adding that it had since beefed up its liaison units, which are now active across 250 “Israeli” municipalities to provide assistance in case of any attack.

The “Home Front” Command uses computer projections to predict a rocket's trajectory after it has been launched, and advises "Israelis", within a specific range, to head to bomb shelters.

During the Gaza conflict in May, this allowed emergency services to "go to every incident within less than five minutes", Gordin said from the control room of the unit's headquarters in Ramla, near Tel Aviv.

He said preparations had been made for any incidents on the border with Lebanon.

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