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Egyptian Archeologist Discover 3000 y/o Nobleman’s Tomb
Local Editor

A 3,000-year-old nobleman's tomb has been discovered by Egyptian archeologists - the latest in a series of major discoveries of ancient relics.

Egyptian archeologists

Discovered near the Nile city of Luxor, it contains the remains of Userhat, who worked as a judge in the New Kingdom from roughly 1,500 to 1,000 B.C.

The vault consists of an open court leading into a rectangular hall, a corridor and inner chamber, according to the country's Ministry of Antiquities.

In one of the rooms in the tomb, archaeologists found a collection of figurines, wooden masks and a handle of a sarcophagus lid. Excavation is continuing in a second chamber.

Earlier this year, Swedish archaeologists discovered 12 ancient Egyptian cemeteries near the southern city of Aswan that date back almost 3,500 years.

In March, an eight-meter statue that is believed to be King Psammetich 1, who ruled from 664 to 610 BC, was discovered in a Cairo slum.

Hisham El Demery, chief of Egypt's Tourism Development Authority, said tourism was picking up and discoveries like the one at Luxor would encourage the sector.

"These discoveries are positive news from Egypt's tourism industry, which is something we all really need," he said.

Tourism in Egypt had suffered in the aftermath of the mass protests that toppled former president Hosni Mubarak in 2011. Militant bomb attacks had also deterred foreign visitors.

Source: News Agencies, Edited by website team

20-04-2017 | 15:10


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